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First-ever luxury space hotel will launch in 2021

An out-of-this-world hotel is set to launch in 2021. California-based firm Orion Span has announced that its luxury 'space hotel' will be in orbit within four years, and able to welcome passenger within five years
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An out-of-this-world hotel is set to launch in 2021.

California-based firm Orion Span has announced that first-ever luxury ‘space hotel’ will be in orbit within four years, and able to welcome passenger within five years.

But a stay won’t come cheap. The firm is charging space tourists $9.5 million (£6.7 million) for a 12-day visit.

The experience will allow guests to test out zero gravity and gaze upon stunning views of Earth, as well as witness an average of 16 sunrises and sunsets a day.

An out-of-this-world hotel is set to launch in 2021. California-based firm Orion Span has announced that its luxury ‘space hotel’ will be in orbit within four years, and able to welcome passenger within five years

The project was announced yesterday at the Space 2.0 summit in San Jose, California.

The space hotel, dubbed Aurora Station, will house six people at any one time – four paying passengers and two crew.

Orion Span was founded by Frank Bunger, now the CEO, and the company claims it’s mission is to ‘build and sustain human communities in space accessible to all.’

‘We developed Aurora Station to provide a turnkey destination in space,’ Bunger said at the summit.

‘Upon launch, Aurora Station goes into service immediately, bringing travellers into space quicker and at a lower price point than ever seen before, while still providing an unforgettable experience.’

Although the company intends to build the space station itself, it has yet to confirm launch details with any other firms.

It is believed the space hotel will be modular in design, making it easier to launch and add to at a later date.

Orbiting Earth every couple of hours, the lucky few guests will be able to experience 16 sunrises and sunsets a day. Developed by Orion Span, a California-based company, the space hotel will house six people at any one time – four paying passengers and two crew

As well as the extraordinary accomodation, customers will be able to take part and experience aspects of life as an astronaut.

Bunger told Forbes: ‘We have a virtual reality experience, what we call the holodeck, named after Star Trek.

‘Lastly, when the guests return home to Earth, we’re going to treat them to a hero’s welcome.’

Although pegged as a space hotel and offering all the bells and whistles for the guests, Aurora will also serve other functions outside of hospitality.

‘Aurora Station is incredibly versatile and has multiple uses beyond serving as a hotel,’ Bunger explained.

‘We will offer full charters to space agencies who are looking to achieve human spaceflight in orbit for a fraction of the cost – and only pay for what they use.

‘We will support zero gravity research, as well as in space manufacturing.

‘Our architecture is such that we can easily add capacity, enabling us to grow with market demand like a city growing skyward on Earth.’

Inspired by the International Space Station (ISS), the Aurora Station is considerably smaller. It will be about the size of a large private jet’s cabin, measuring 43.5 feet long by 14.1 feet wide (13.3 by 4.3 meters) and feature a pressurised volume of 5,650 cubic feet (160 cubic m).

The space station will be about the size of a large private jet’s cabin, measuring 43.5 feet long by 14.1 feet wide (13.3 by 4.3 meters) and feature a pressurised volume of 5,650 cubic feet (160 cubic m).

With cloth and material switched out on every flight and high speed wireless internet to keep in touch with friends and family, the Aurora hotel is designed to be a luxurious stay.

Unlike most hotels however, the guests will be living in zero gravity conditions for the duration of the trip.

An ambitious time scale was also revealed at the summit, with Bunger claiming that the hotel will launch by 2021.

After a brief period of time, tourists will be welcomed to the orbiting hotel the following year.

Whilst the total cost of a return ticket is $9.5 million (£6.7 million), those keen to experience ‘the world’s first luxury space hotel’ will be required to put down a $80,000 (£57,129) deposit up front.

The 12 day experience equates to more than $28,00 (£20,000) an hour.

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