Unexplained
Paranormal Phenomena

Has the mystery of the Bermuda triangle been solved?

The region, which covers a patch of sea between Florida, Puerto Rico, and Bermuda (illustrated), is thought to have claimed dozens of ships and planes in the last century alone, and hundreds of lives
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From sub-sea pyramids to hexagonal clouds and alien bases, scientists and conspiracy theorist alike have drummed up every imaginable scenario over the years to explain the mysterious disappearances in the Bermuda Triangle.

The region, which covers a patch of sea between Florida, Puerto Rico, and Bermuda, is thought to have claimed dozens of ships and planes in the last century alone, and hundreds of lives.

Now, researchers say rogue waves upto 100ft high could be to blame.

The region, which covers a patch of sea between Florida, Puerto Rico, and Bermuda (illustrated), is thought to have claimed dozens of ships and planes in the last century alone, and hundreds of lives

Experts at the University of Southampton believe the mystery can be explained by a natural phenomenon known as ‘rogue waves.’

Researchers re-created the monster water surges for Channel 5 documentary ‘The Bermuda Triangle Enigma.’

Rogue waves are exceptionally powerful and dangerous, and can reach heights of up to 100 feet (30 metres).

The rogue waves are often referred to by scientists as ‘extreme storm waves’.

The Southampton research team built a model of the USS Cyclops, a huge vessel which went missing in the triangle in 1918 claiming 300 lives.

And because of its sheer size and flat base, it does not take long before the model is overcome with water during the simulation.

The Cyclops was a coal-carrying ship used to ferry fuel to American warships during World War One, and was on its way from Bahia, in Salvador, to Baltimore when it vanished in 1918.

No wreckage from the 542ft vessel has ever been found, nor has any trace of the 306 crew and passengers it was carrying at the time.

While in theory it could have disappeared anywhere between Bahia and Baltimore, not necessarily in the Triangle, supporters of the theory argue that the lack of a distress call from the vessel means it met with a supernatural end.

The 309 killed on board the Cyclops remains the single biggest loss of life in U.S. Naval history not involving combat.

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