Huge supermoon due for November 14th

Huge supermoon due for November 14th

Huge supermoon due for November 14th

0 comments 📅06 November 2016, 23:30

It is set to be an incredible astronomical show – and one which won’t appear again until 2034.

On November 14th, the Moon will be the closest to Earth it’s been since January 1948.

During the event, it will appear up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than an average full moon.

On November 14th, the Moon will be the closest to Earth it's been since January 1948. During the event, it will appear up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than an average full moon.

On November 14th, the Moon will be the closest to Earth it’s been since January 1948. During the event, it will appear up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than an average full moon.

Miss it, and you’re in for a long wait – it is the closest the Moon will get to Earth until 25 November 2034.

In fact, it is the third supermoon of the year – and the most impressive.

On October 16 and December 14, the moon becomes full on the same day as perigee.

However, on November 14, it becomes full within about two hours of perigee—arguably making it an extra-super moon.

It is not only the closest full moon of 2016 but also the closest full moon to date in the 21st century.

It will happen in the morning hours before sunrise in western North America and the Pacific islands to the east of the International Date Line).

The best time to view a super moon is when the moon is low on the horizon where ‘an illusion will occur that makes it look unnaturally larger,’ according to AccuWeather.

However, the moon will look plenty full and bright all night long on both nights, astronomers say – November 13 and 14 – as it rises in the east around sunset, climbs highest up around midnight, and then sets in the west at or near sunset.

The moon will reach the crest of its full phase on November 14 at 1352 UTC.

That translates to 9:52 a.m. AST, 8:52 a.m. EST, 7:52 a.m. CST, 6:52 a.m. MST, 5:52 a.m. PST.

The supermoon of December 14 will beremarkable for a different reason: it’s going to wipe out the view of the Geminid meteor shower, Nasa said..

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/