Millions of mummified dogs unearthed in Egyptian catacombs

Millions of mummified dogs unearthed in Egyptian catacombs

Millions of mummified dogs unearthed in Egyptian catacombs

0 comments 📅23 June 2015, 02:16

The ancient Egyptians believed that Anubis was the god of the afterlife. He was portrayed in their history as a jackal-headed god. Like Hades of the Underworld to the Ancient Greeks.Well according to the June 20 reports from both CNN and UPI, around 8 million mummified animals were found in the Catacombs of Anubis. It was mostly mummified dogs that were found in the catacombs.

The project’s director was Paul Nicholson from Cardiff University’s School of History, Archeology, and Religion. Nicholson has been studying animal cults since the ’90s. He called it not a sort of a blood sacrifice, but a religious act. Either way, it’s a morbid act for many to think about it. Though the ancient Egyptians, had a hope that the animal used in the sacrifice will make Anubis pleased. If their god of the afterlife was pleased, he then might have taken care of the deceased relative.

Nicholson and his group have been working in on the Saqqara site since 2009. Researchers before were more focused on the temples outside of the catacombs. Now the discovery made many surprised at how many remains were found. They found wrapped in bandages, mummified, and stacked on top of each other. The catacombs are believed to be between 750 B.C. to 30 B.C. The group will be continuing their work on the site to find more about the animal catacombs, to examine monuments like the pyramid of Djoser, and to find more about the remains that were found. They want to be happy to determine the age and sex of the dogs. The other animals that were found were foxes, cats, and falcons.

The size of the animals were quite small, so it was believed that they weren’t sacrificed when they were very mature. Nicholson, Salima Ikram, and Steven Mills had published an article about the findings. The article is called “The Catacombs of Anubis at North Saqqara.” The article is on the Cambridge Journal site,

source: http://www.examiner.com/