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Nasa’s spacecraft made to deflect incoming asteroids has entered the final stages and will launch ‘by 2020’

The joint US-European Aida (Asteroid Deflection & Assessment) mission will crash a probe into the smaller of a pair of binary asteroids to see if the object's path can be altered
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Nasa’s plans to launch a spacecraft capable of crashing into an asteroid to knock it off its collision course with Earth has now entered the final stages.

The space agency is set to fire its Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) system, which could one-day be called upon to save the planet, into space by 2020.

DART is set to target the binary asteroid Didymos to test the system, following approval from Nasa late last month.

Although the egg-shaped target, also known as ‘Didymoon’, is only 160 metres (525ft) across, the test will highlight whether the technique cold be used to deflect a much larger asteroid that threatens to wipe out human civilisation.

The joint US-European Aida (Asteroid Deflection & Assessment) mission will crash a probe into the smaller of a pair of binary asteroids to see if the object’s path can be altered

The DART system is being designed, built and managed by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland.

The joint US-European Aida (Asteroid Deflection & Assessment) mission will crash a probe into the smallest of two binary asteroids to test whether the object’s path is able to be altered by the spacecraft.

As it stands, Nasa is unable to deflect an asteroid set to impact Earth.

The space agency could only hope to mitigate the impact of the asteroid by issuing evacuation orders to protect lives and property.

‘With DART, we want to understand the nature of asteroids by seeing how a representative body reacts when impacted, with an eye toward applying that knowledge if we are faced with the need to deflect an incoming object,’ said APL’s Andrew Rivkin, who co-leads the DART investigation with APL’s Andrew Cheng.

‘In addition, DART will be the first planned visit to a binary asteroid system, which is an important subset of near-Earth asteroids and one we have yet to fully understand.’

DART would use what is known as a ‘kinetic impactor technique’ — striking the asteroid to shift its orbit.

The impact would change the speed of a threatening asteroid by a small fraction of its total velocity.

However, doing so well before a predicted impact adds up enough over time to result in a big shift of the asteroid’s path from Earth.

Dr Patrick Michel, lead investigator for the European Space Agency half of the mission, said back in 2015: ‘To protect Earth from potentially hazardous impacts, we need to understand asteroids much better – what they are made of, their structure, origins and how they respond to collisions.

‘Aida will be the first mission to study an asteroid binary system, as well as the first to test whether we can deflect an asteroid through an impact with a spacecraft.

‘The European part of the mission… will study the structure of Didymoon and the orbit and rotation of the binary system, providing clues to its origin and evolution.

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