Researchers say they are on the verge of finding hidden chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza

Researchers say they are on the verge of finding hidden chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza

Researchers say they are on the verge of finding hidden chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza

0 comments 📅06 August 2017, 23:58

From the pyramids of Giza to the tombs of Luxor, Egypt’s ancient monuments have held on to mysteries for thousands of years.

Experts now believe they are on the brink of finding a hidden ‘recess’ in the Great Pyramid of Giza.

A project called ScanPyramids is using infrared thermography among other techniques to find out the secrets of this hidden chamber and date artefacts.

Also known as Khufu Pyramid, it stands at 479 feet (146 metres) high and was the world’s tallest man-made structure for nearly 4,000 years.

A project called ScanPyramids is using infrared thermography among other techniques to find out the secrets of this hidden chamber and date artefacts.

ScanPyramids is among the most ambitious of the projects to demystify the Khufu Pyramid near Cairo, which was completed in about 2560 BC.

‘All the devices we put in place are designed to find where the cavity is located. We know there is one, but we’re trying to find out where,’ said Mehdi Tayoubi, president of the HIP Institute heading the ScanPyramids project.

It is the only surviving monument from the ancient Seven Wonders of the World.

The 3D graphic shows the known structures inside the Khufu pyramid. The pyramid stands at 479 feet (146 metres) high and was the world’s tallest man-made structure for nearly 4,000 years

Chemical testing still requires small samples, but advanced techniques coming into use are meant to be non-invasive so as not to damage the ancient relics.

Researchers are also using muography which looks for charged particles to help date artefacts.

The results are then compared with infrared and 3D images.

Some archaeologists have pinned hopes on using the sophisticated technology to locate the burial place of the legendary queen Nefertiti.

The wife of King Akhenaten, who initiated a monotheistic cult in ancient Egypt, queen Nefertiti remains an enigma, best known for a bust depicting her that is now on exhibition in Berlin’s Neues Museum.

A British Egyptologist, Nicholas Reeves, believed her remains were hidden in a secret chamber in the tomb of Tutankhamun, in the southern Valley of the Kings.

In 2015, archaeologists scanned the tomb with radar hoping to find clues.

Both Reeves’s theory and the inconclusive results have been dismissed by other Egyptologists.

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